UMEA Hall of Fame

Inducted February, 2017

Wayne Erickson
Ralph Gochnour
Carol Goodson
Ralph Matesky
Tom Nelson

Wayne Erickson Family

Wayne Erickson

Wayne was born in Price, Utah. He was educated in the Carbon County Public Schools and graduated from Carbon High School. He was very blessed to be taught by great music teachers: Alvin Wardle, Derral Siggard, Glen Fifield, Deane Brown and Dorothy Brown. He attended the College of Eastern Utah, earning an AS in Music. His BM degree is from USU, where he played in the Symphonic Band and sang in the Chorale and Chamber Choirs. His MM degree is from BYU. Wayne has additional graduate work at University of Northern Colorado, Michigan State University and the University of Texas at Austin. He studied conducting with Ralph Laycock, Eugene Corporan, John Rutter and H. Robert Reynolds. Wayne both started his teaching career and ended it at Monticello HS in Monticello, Utah.
In 1973 his Monticello HS Band was named the Best American Band at the Calgary Stampede. The MHS Band grew from 17 members to 98 members even though the school only had 170 students. He then moved to Carbon HS where his band was honored to play on the evening honors concert at the USU Band Festivals in 1974 and 1975. While attending BYU in pursuit of a master's degree, he was the band director at Provo HS. His band was named the Sweepstakes Award winner at the Durango Fine Arts Festival in 1978 and 1979. During his high school teaching, his groups were consistently awarded superior ratings. In 1979 Wayne accepted a position at Snow College as the Director of Bands. One of his students at Snow was Vance Larsen, who has overseen tremendous growth in that institution during the past decade. During this time, he served as UMEA Vice President of Bands and was on the committees that established the State Solo and Ensemble Festival and the State Band Festival. He was inducted into the Snow College Music Hall of Fame in 2012. Wayne was hired as the music teacher at Emery County High School in 1985. The Emery Symphonic Band and A Cappella Choir were named the outstanding groups at the region festivals in 1985 and 1986. The band also earned superior ratings at the state band festival those two years.
The opportunity of a lifetime presented itself in 1987 when Wayne was hired as the first contract music faculty at what was then Utah Valley Community College. For the next twenty-two years, he oversaw tremendous growth in the music program, developing the AS/AA and BS music education curricula, hiring faculty, developing scholarship opportunities, and building a strong music program. He served as Chair of the Fine and Performing Arts department, then of the Performing Arts department and eventually the Music Department. While at Utah Valley University, he was awarded the Dean’s Scholarship Award for a Creative Project, his band arrangement and performance of the Marcello Oboe Concerto. In 1994 the UVSC Symphony Band was selected to perform at the College Band Director’s National Conference in Reno, Nevada. That year he was awarded the “Superior Accomplishment” award from UMEA. In 2009, he was awarded the Ragan Theater Merit Award. Other service opp ortunities included being a Faculty Senator and as a member of the Strategic Directions Committee. When Wayne retired from UVU in 2009, the music program consisted of seven contract faculty. The UVU choir, jazz band, and orchestra had all performed at the UMEA In-service Conference.
After his retirement from UVU, Wayne was employed as the music teacher at Monticello HS in San Juan School District. Many of his students were the grandchildren of people he had taught at that school in the early 1970's. His Symphonic Band and A Cappella Choir earned superior ratings at region and state festivals. Wayne was honored as Teacher of the Year in 2011. He retired again in 2014 but was rehired as a mentor for the district’s music teachers. Wayne also teaches part-time on the Blanding campus of USU-Eastern.
Throughout his career. Wayne has been a member of UMEA/MENC, ACDA, NAJE, and CBDNA. He served as UMEA President from 1999 to 2001 and as President of the College Band Director’s Association - Western Division from 2003 to 2005. He has been active as a clinician and adjudicator throughout the western states.
Perhaps the musical highlight of his career was in Abravanel Hall as the conductor of the 2008 Utah All-state Band. Wayne and his wife Laurie are the parents of nine children, two who became music teachers. Eight of his children played and sang in groups he conducted (not always a fun experience for him). He enjoys time with his 13 grandchildren and his great grandson Kai, passionately bow hunting, fishing and jeeping in Utah and Colorado.

Ralph Gochnour Family

Ralph Gochnour

I grew up on a dairy farm in Burley, Idaho. I was number six of a family of eight children. Most of my older siblings played a musical instrument, so I had experience with the sights and sounds of music. I started to play the flu te in the seventh grade on an old instrument passed down from my older brother. My high school band director, Ramon Trosczewsky, otherwise known as Mr. Tross, would call me in for private lessons at no charge. This really sparked my interest in playing the flute. In my sophomore year, Mr. Tross arranged for a retired Hollywood studio musician who lived in Castleford, Idaho, to travel 75 miles to Burley to give some private lessons and tune a few pianos. He instilled in me a great love for the flute, and I progressed to the point that I was admitted to the Eastman School of Music upon graduation. For financial reasons, I later transferred to the University of Utah where I finished my Bachelor of Science degree in Music Education. After graduation, I was appointed Assistant Director of Bands under Dr. Ronald Gregory and his successor, Dr. Forest Stoll. At this point, my life took off in an unusual direction. In 1956, I auditioned and was hired for the position of Second Flute with the Utah Symphony, and for the next sixteen years, I had to juggle two demanding professions. I started my teaching career in 1957 at Jordan Jr. High School in Salt Lake City. I was there for two years and then transferred to South High School where I taught for the next fourteen years. I handled all of the instrumental music at South High. I dealt with extra-curricular musicals and had an outstanding dance/stage band which I loved very much. You cannot begin to imagine the mental gymnastics and strain of holding down a full time teaching position and a full symphony season, but I was young and had a supportive wife at home, raising five boys. The Salt Lake School District allowed those of us that were in the Utah Symphony to hire our own substitutes when we had to be away for school concerts and tours. This worked out very well for me because I was able to get advanced students in music education from the University of Utah to fill in for me. It gave the students great experience and allowed our programs to continue undisturbed. As the years went by, the symphony schedule became more demanding and put even greater strain on my abilities to manage a full teaching schedule. During this time the Symphony had European tours of three and four week durations as well as statewide school concerts and local tours. In 1971, Maurice Abravanel called in all the people who were teaching in the public schools and offered a slight raise if we would devote our full time to the symphony. Most agreed and for the next 25 years, I held the assistant principal and second flute position in the orchestra. I am honored to receive this award since I only taught in public schools for sixteen years. When you consider the hundreds and hundreds of school concerts that we played throughout the state and private lessons and clinics that we gave, I guess we can call that music education and I truly loved every minute of it.

Carol Goodson

Carol Goodson

Having freshly graduated from BYU with a BA in Music, I started making music with the eager students in the Mesa Public Schools, where eventually my students nicknamed me “Miz Goodness,” much to my amusement. Wanting more skills and expertise in choral conducting, I completed a Masters at NAU and took a sabbatical to work with the choral students at Waterford School in conjunction with earning a PHD in Music at the U of U. With the doctorate in hand I was hired as the music co-director for the Southeast Center for Education in the Arts at UTC in Chattanooga, Tennessee. There I gained valuable professional development experience, working with Dr. Jeff Patten, which I was able to utilize in my subsequent position at the Utah State Office of Education. I found that my new colleagues were exceptional in their desire to collaborate. These extraordinary colleagues included the Utah Arts Council, UAAHE, DACs, POPS, UMEA, UAEA, UDE O, UTA, C AUS-University professors, and Beverley Taylor Sorenson. Some examples of the collaborative projects this made possible were: Trade Secrets, expanded Arts Networking Conferences and the summer Elementary Arts Retreat. Working with my talented consultants and colleagues, both inside and outside of the state educational system, we were able to facilitate training for classroom teachers to provide arts education for elementary students across the state. My opportunities continued to expand, and I accepted the opportunity to follow Clint Frohm as Granite District's Music Specialist. The "bonus" was involvement with the devoted conductors of the Granite Youth Symphony, the "challenge" was working through the Granite school board's changes in elementary arts education, and the “adventure” was developing and implementing performance assessments for secondary music. In summary, I would like to say how blessed I have been to be able to obtain the education needed to provide me with the professional opportunities that I have been so grateful for. I am also extremely fortunate to have had such supportive and inspiring colleagues and mentors, whose advice and influence gave me many opportunities in the arts, in education and most particularly in the field of music, which has always been my greatest joy.

Ralph Matesky Family

Ralph Matesky

(Biographical material gleaned from Robert S. Frost's tribute from American String Teacher, November 2004 and from Ralph's son, Michael Matesky.) Ralph Matesky was born January 4, 1913 in New York City. At age 4, his family moved to Modesto, California where his father was a violinist in the San Francisco Symphony. Ralph attended Stockton High School and, at age 15, Modesto Junior College. In 1930, he enrolled as a scholarship student at the Juilliard School of Music while simultaneously attending Columbia University. While there, he received his diploma in violin, graduate diploma degree and music education degree. He graduated from Juilliard as president of his class. In 1951, Ralph received his M.M. in composition from the University of Southern California. His teachers included Howard Murphy, Paul Creston and Roger Sessions. He taught violin at the University of North Dakota, performed in String Quartets and co-founded the Northwest Conservatory of Music in Grand Forks, ND. Moving to Los Angeles, he played in nine Hollywood studio orchestras. Ralph began his public school music teaching career at Roosevelt Junior/Senior High School in Compton, California. During the first year, his program grew from 7 students to include a band, orchestra and string ensemble! After hours, he worked as a violinist, violist and arranger for the Ice Capades, radio, television, and wrote musicals. In 1948, Ralph became Supervisor of Music in the Compton Unified School District, a position he held for 15 years.
His arrangement for elementary school orchestra of “Oh, What a Beautiful Morning,” from Oklahoma was published by Chappell Music. In the mid-1950s, Ralph and Ardelle Womack developed the groundbreaking Learn to Play a Stringed Instrument. His compositions received national attention at the 1958 MENC conference in Los Angeles, where the Compton Elementary Schools Festival Orchestra brilliantly performed some of his arrangements. The video of the great 1954 and 1955 Compton Elementary School Festival Orchestra is at: youtube.com/watch?v=K0XHWv54ID8. Ralph conducted orchestras at Idyllwild School of Music and the Arts from 1958 - 1965. Daughter Elizabeth, violinist, and son Michael, cellist, played in those orchestras. Ralph led the Idyllwild Youth Symphony on two wonderful European tours: England and Wales (1964) and Scandinavia (1965). Meredith Willson narrated the 1965 tour film Touches of Sweet Harmony, (youtube.com/playlist?list=PL025101B90568653E).
In 1963, Ralph became conductor of the Stockton Symphony Orchestra and Associate Professor of violin and conducting at the University of the Pacific. He also founded the San Joaquin Youth Symphony. During an all-state guest conducting appearance in Hawaii, he met Max Dalby, Professor and Department Chair of music at Utah State University. Through Max's persuasive description of opportunities at USU, Ralph and Betty moved to Logan, Utah in 1967 where he became Professor of Music, conductor of the university orchestra and director of string education. He also founded the Northern Wasatch Youth Symphony and led the ensemble on two tours to Mexico. Ralph was a prominent member of the American String Teachers Association, serving as national president from 1968-1970. During his time with ASTA he instituted the first ASTA National Orchestra. He developed a strong relationship with the Japanese String Teachers Association and was accorded the seventh honorary membership in JASTA. In 1978, ASTA honored Ralph with the Distinguished Service Award. Ralph's many awards and citations included the ASCAP Special Award for "Outstanding work on behalf of Music Education," the ASTA award for "Valuable Contributions to MENC," recognition from groups in Los Angeles, Belgium, Mexico City and Venice, Italy. His association and work with renowned artists read like an international who’s who and included Craig Jessop, Paul Katz, Michael Tilson Thomas, Nathaniel Rosen, Gary Karr, David Jolley, Dennis Trembly, Christie Lundquist and Akira Endo.
In 1977, Ralph and Betty moved to Seattle to be near his son Michael and his wife, Nancy. He continued work on arrangements, including the Finale from Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony for school orchestra. The published work arrived in the mail on March 1, 1979. Two days later, March 3rd, Ralph passed away of heart failure.
Ralph's son Michael said the most significant event in Dad's life occurred January 7, 1941, when he and Betty were married. Always together, they enjoyed a rich life of mutual love, devotion, and great musical and educational accomplishment. Theirs was a great bond of love.


Tom Nelson Family

Tom Nelson

Tom Nelson was born in 1928 in Park City. His father at various times worked as a sheepherder, miner, and coyote trapper. "Tommy" played the trombone in the school band, and at the age of 12 found himself playing the drums with dance bands for the Saturday night Miners Union Hall dances. He has lots of interesting stories from these times. He always had assumed that he would grow up to work in the mines, but his mother had other ideas. She arranged for him to go to a summer music camp at BYU during high school. The music bug bit him, and he enrolled in BYU in 1946. While playing in the BYU band, he met a bass clarinetist from Star Valley, Wyoming named Shirley Allred. They were married in 1948. The first teaching job was at Wayne County in 1950. He taught there for only one year, after which the young couple moved to Afton, Wyoming. He taught band and choir at Star Valley High School until 1956. His most often repeated m emory from that time involves the school production of the new hit musical "Oklahoma." Apparently, it was too racy for 1950s Star Valley; the morning after opening night, he was summoned to a meeting in the principal's office, also attended by the School Superintendent, the Seminary Principal, and the Stake President. He was told to cut the song "I’m Just a Girl Who Cain't Say No" from future productions. In 1956, the family moved to Logan, where Tom was hired to teach band at South Cache High School in Hyrum. South Cache became a junior high in 1964. Tom taught at the new Sky View High in Smithfield for one year before m oving to Logan High in 1965. He remembers being booed by the crowd the first year he marched the Logan High Band in the Hyrum 4th of July parade (deep in Sky View territory). During this time, he earned a Masters Degree from USU, studying low brass with Al Wardle. The small orchestra which accompanied his Masters Recital was conducted by a former South Cache High student named Mike Bankhead. After about 15 years of teach ing band and English (and all five of his own children) at Logan High, he moved to Mount Logan Middle School, where he taught until retiring in 1986. The following year, he opened a music store on Logan's Main Street. That lasted only a year. He said that he hadn't fully realized that he would have to work on Saturdays and the week after Christmas. And all summer. And that people would actually come in and shoplift reeds and violin rosin. Then Al Koch, the principal at Preston High School in southern Idaho, contacted him. Tom was lured out of retirement with the offer of not running a music store, and finished his career in Preston. While there, he built the band from 12 members to over 120. He taught all of the bands, from beginner through high school, as well as jazz band, pep band, marching band, and orchestra. He rode the bus with the band to contests and games as far away as Couer d’Alene. He retired and was rehired in Preston several times. His final retirement was when he was 70, after a total of 46 years on the podium. Many prominent musicians and music educators went through Tom's band programs, both as students and as student teachers. This list includes Mike Bankhead, Michael Ballam, Sheri Manning, Mike Christiansen, Bruce Dalby, Becky Dalby, Sheri Beecher, Jeneil Tams, Earl Swenson, Scott Schwab, Dan Stowell, Larry Janes, Jeff Wagner, Ken Peterson, Hal Briggs, Chris Rasmussen, and Greg Wheeler. Tom also played drums in dance bands throughout northern Utah. Bandmates included Gene Tueller, Ray Haslam, Earl Swenson, and Lou Fornoff. After his final retirement, he ran a band instrument repair shop in his garage for several years. Now, at the age of 88, Tom still lives at home. He wishes he could have come to St. George for this event, but nowadays, a ride to Brigham City for dinner at The Maddox is too far!


Inducted February, 2016

Clyn Barrus
David Blackington
Larry Hill
Steve Richins
Larry Smith

Clyn Burras Family

Clyn Burras

Clyn D. Barrus grew up on a farm in Sugar City, Idaho, the son of Ruth and LaMar Barrus. Although milking cows and driving tractors were a natural expectation, the refined influence of his piano/organ teaching mother at Ricks College (BYU Idaho) had a profound influence on him. At a young age, he began violin lessons and knew instantly that he wanted to become a musician. After winning a scholarship to the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia at age sixteen, he began study on the viola under the tutelage of Max Aronoff, which he pursued for the next three years. During the summers he was selected to participate in the International String Congresses held in Puerto Rico and Oklahoma. In April of 1963, he gave a final recital at the Curtis Institute of Music and left in June for an LDS mission to Austria. Encouraged by his leaders to use his viola as part of his missionary efforts, he became acquainted with many musicians in Vienna, one of whom was Eduard Melkus, professor of viola at the Vienna Academy of Music and well-known performer throughout Europe. He invited Clyn to study with him following his mission, which he did, following a three-week return to Idaho-just long enough to marry his waiting finance, Marilyn Biddulph. While studying in Vienna, Melkus provided many opportunities for him to perform and record throughout Austria and Europe. Upon graduation from the Vienna Academy of Music, Clyn was awarded the "Ausserordentliche Auszeichnung" award as the top graduating student. The results of a professional recital given in Vienna at this time brought him the position of Principal Violist with the Vienna Symphony. In this position, he had the opportunity to perform under the most prestigious conductors in the world and participate with the orchestra in a world tour throughout Europe, the United States and Asia. In 1968, he left this position to earn a doctoral degree at the University of Michigan. Upon completion of his degree, he joined the faculty of Southern Illinois University, teaching and performing as violist in the Illinois Quartet. In 1972, he joined the Minnesota Orchestra, where he served as principal violist, and had many opportunities to solo with them throughout the world. While in Minnesota, he also played in the University of Minnesota Quartet, conducted the Minneapolis Civic Orchestra, and was the Music Director and Conductor for the Minnesota Youth Symphony. In 1985, he accepted the position of Director of Orchestras at Brigham Young University, conducting the Philharmonic and Chamber Orchestras. He led the Chamber Orchestra on tours throughout the United States, Canada, the British Isles, Central Europe, and the Middle East. He was made chairman of the Department of Music in 1993 and was instrumental in helping it to become the Brigham Young University School of Music, serving as its first director. He also accepted the position to conduct the Utah Valley Symphony, which he did for seven years prior to his death. In a talk given at BYU, Clyn made the following statement: "I dearly love the arts and especially the art of music. What a joy it has been to devote so much of my life to something that lies close to my heart. There is so much more to the arts than just technic or phrasing or lines and melodies. Rather, it is an expression of the artist's relationship to every aspect of life. The quality of that relationship is extremely important, if the communication from the artist is to be of value." Making the various aspects of his life meaningful was always an important focus. One of those aspects was that of teaching students, which he did wherever he lived. He had a great love for all those with whom he had the opportunity to associate and a unique gift for expressing this love. His family, Marilyn and their six children were the greatest recipients of his love and his patient and encouraging training and teaching. At the vibrant age of fifty-four, he developed a malignant brain tumor. After a few months of intense treatment, he died peacefully, surrounded by his family, on February 27, 1998.

Steve Richins Family

Steve Richins

Steve, who was born and raised in northern California, was sure he wanted to be an instrumental band teacher by the time he was in fourth grade, thanks to Mr. Walcott, his elementary school band instructor. Quite taken by the Jazz program, he worked at mastering the clarinet only to move on to the infamous sax! Upon finishing his education at the University of California, Chico, he taught at Pinole Valley High School in the Bay Area. There he learned many lessons and enjoyed the company of numerous talented students. After four years at Pinole, Steve had the opportunity to teach at Woods Cross High School in Utah, where he spent the next fifteen years of his educational career. With the help of Bob Campbell's great program at South Davis Jr. High, many devoted students, parents, faculty, and administrators, the music program at Woods Cross progressed into one of the finest in the state. Steve had genuine passion and zeal for teaching and tried to inspire those around him to reach their highest potential. He was not above throwing an occasional baton to get someone's attention or have kids run cymbal laps for being late to a rehearsal! At Woods Cross, Steve refined his teaching prowess, stimulated by great and talented students, some of whom became lifetime friends. In addition to his formal educational career, Steve was always giving private lessons, adjudicating, or playing in a local band. He left Woods Cross in 1991 to be an administrator at Viewmont High School, where he worked until 2001. At Viewmont, he continued to be an advocate for education in general and the Arts in particular. He was much loved by the Viewmont faculty for his genial manner and profound educational vision. During this time, he was also a music consultant for the State Board of Education, and he spent as much of his extra time as he could continuing to be a part of the music arena he loved. Steve always appreciated the huge pool of talented instructors and musicians in Utah. He developed many great associations through the years, and if he were here today, I'm sure he would express his gratitude and appreciation for each of you. It goes without saying that Steve is greatly missed. We do find comfort, however, in the enduring legacy of his life and career, which was characterized by one former student as a "life that was an inspiration of both music and humanity."

Larry Hill

Larry Hill

Larry Hill grew up in Orem, Utah. He first became interested in music playing the accordion when he was eight years old. He and his brother, Jay, played accordion and guitar duets for many church and civic activities. His accordion teacher suggested he play the French horn in band. Since the horn cost $700 and a clarinet cost $135, he became a clarinetist. The only decision he made in high school about his future career was that he would never be a teacher. After enjoying teaching as an LDS missionary, he changed his mind. He received a Bachelor's degree in 1971 and a Master's degree in 1986, both from Brigham Young University. He taught band for 35 years: one year in Bancroft, Idaho, nine years at Orem High School team teaching with Wes Barry, and 25 years at Lakeridge Junior High, also in Orem. He received the Utah Music Educator's 2001-2002 Outstanding Junior High/Middle School Educator award. Many of his students have gone on to perform professionally or become band directors. But his greatest accomplishment has been helping thousands of students gain a greater appreciation of music. Shortly before his retirement in 2006, a new teacher in the district asked him to write down how he had survived teaching band for 35 years. He did that, and his son converted it into the website JrHighBand.com, "Survival Tips for Junior High and Middle School Band Directors." Through the website, he continues to assist band directors all over the country. In 2015, he received the Educator Hero award from the Utah Valley chapter of the Red Cross. He married Kay Jacobson in 1970, and they are the proud parents of five talented children and grandparents of 14 incredible grandchildren.

David Blackington

David Blackington

David Blackinton was born in Ogden, Utah. He was educated in the Ogden Public Schools and graduated from Ogden High School. He was greatly influenced by his jr. high band director, A.C. Cook and his trumpet teacher, Fay Hanson. He attended Weber College and received his BM and MM degrees from the University of Michigan and Doctor of Musical Arts degree from The Catholic University of America in Washington DC. He taught at the University of Delaware from 1965- 1980 and at Brigham Young University from 1980 until his retirement in 2008 after 43 years of college teaching. David had a successful career as a professional trumpet player and teacher. He was Principal Trumpet in the Delaware Symphony and played extensively in both Delaware and Utah. He also performed at the International Brass Symposium in Montreaux, Switzerland. As Director of Bands at BYU and conductor of the BYU Wind Symphony, Blackinton conducted this ensemble at both regional and national conventions of the College Band Director’s National Association as well as the national meeting of the American Bandmasters Association. He has conducted the BYU Wind Symphony in Taiwan, China, Philippines, England, Wales, New Zealand, Australia, Russia, Finland, Baltic States, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Czech Republic, Norway, Sweden, Denmark as well as 3 extend tours of the United States and Canada. Dr. Blackinton was inducted into the American Bandmasters Association in 1994. He has been a member of the College Band Directors National Association and the National Association for Music Education. He has served as President of UMEA and President of the Western Division of the College Band Directors National Association. Since his retirement from BYU, he has been Professor of Trumpet at Snow College. He always felt and told his students, "There hasn't been a day in my career that I haven't loved going to work!"

Larry Smith

Larry Smith

Larry Smith is the son of William E. and Melda Smith, who both loved and played music. He was raised in Franklin, Idaho and attended Preston High School. He started piano lessons in sixth grade and began playing clarinet in seventh grade. He played in the PHS band and sang in the PHS choirs. As a sophomore, Larry began playing alto sax and played for dances with the five piece Wheeler orchestra. They played all over the Southern Idaho area. In his Junior and Senior years, he led the basketball pep band and played leading roles in the PHS operettas. Larry attended Utah State University and studied under band directors John Philip Dalby and Max Dalby. Max Dalby was a long time mentor to him. Larry played in the USU bands and sang in the Madrigal Singers. He also played lead alto in the Scotsmen pep and dance band. His junior and senior years Larry led the Scotsmen and wrote arrangements for basketball halftime shows, featuring the Aggiettes. In the spring of 1959, Larry graduated from USU in Music Education and married clarinetist Bonnie Baird, Miss Idaho 1958, that summer. Larry and Bonnie were a team and worked together on many musical extravaganzas. Teaching band and chorus at Smithfield Jr. High was Larry’s first job as a music educator, a half time position. Bonnie and Larry continued studying at USU. In January 1960, Larry took the music director job at Star Valley High School in Afton, Wyo. While at SVHS, Larry led three bands, two choirs and, with the help of Bonnie, produced two musicals. In 1961, Larry began a four year stint as band director at Ben Lomond High School in Ogden, UT. At first, he also taught several English classes, but in his third year he taught band at Mound Fort Jr. High. His last year, he also directed the BLHS choirs. He played a lot of combo gigs on piano while in Ogden. USU Music Department Head, Dr. Max Dalby, hired Larry to teach at USU in 1965. His duties included being assistant band director, arranging half time shows for football games, teaching music theory, ear training, arranging, and leading the Scotsmen dance band. He had his dream job and loved his opportunity to work with USU’s talented students. As the years passed, Larry also taught jazz improvisation, jazz history and led two student jazz bands. He continued to play a lot of combo and big band gigs. Larry and Bonnie have four children: Ned, Monica, Shane and Nate. The three boys play drums and Monica plays clarinet and sings with her dad’s bands. After teaching at USU for 38 years, Larry retired in the spring of 2003. In the fall of 2003, Larry organized the Jazz Kicks Big Band which includes USU faculty members and area professionals. The Kicks Band plays concerts, shows and dances. In 2005 Larry received the first Utah Arts Festival Jazz Masters Award. Bonnie passed in 2013, leaving Larry without her sweetness, wit and companionship. Writing arrangements for the Kicks Band and planning concerts keeps Larry occupied these days. He feels blessed that he has been privileged to spend his career teaching and making music.

Inducted February, 2015

Harold Goodman
Ralph Woodward
Richard Marsden
Wes Barry
Susan Kenney

Harold Goodman

Harold Goodman

Harold Goodman was born in Solomonville, Arizona to Ralph and Marie Goodman on July 14, 1925, the first of five children. By the time he was 6 years old, he moved with his family to Franklin, Arizona where he started school. Music played a vital role in Harold's life starting as a young boy. When he was about 8 years old, his father asked him if he would like to start playing an instrument. He told his father, "probably so." His dad replied, "What would you like to play?" Harold said, "The violin." His schoolteacher, Editha Matheson, drove him to Duncan, three miles away, in order to have violins lessons from Charlie Walters, a gifted violinist. After the lessons he would ride home with his dad, who worked at a nearby service station. Playing the violin began a lifetime career in music, leadership, and service. At the University of Arizona in Tucson, Harold majored in music and while there served as Student Body President and captain of the Wildcat basketball team, competing in the National Invitational Tournament at Madison Square Garden. He married Naomi Foster in 1945, graduated, and began his career in music as Music Supervisor in the Snowflake Public Schools in Snowflake Arizona. He became director of instrumental music in Tucson, Arizona in 1950. In 1952 he moved to Flagstaff, Arizona as Band Director and Instructor of Music. After graduating with a Doctoral Degree in Music Education from the University of California in 1960, he began his career at Brigham Young University, serving nearly 30 years. He spent six years as Chairman of Music Education and another fifteen years as the Music Department Chairman. As his service to the University continued, he also served statewide as president of the Utah Music Educators Association, and nationally as President of the Western Division of the Music Educators National Conference. Harold served as conductor for the Tucson Symphony, University of Hawaii Band and Symphony, Utah Valley Symphony and Utah Valley Youth Symphony. Among his publications are Expressive Musical Performance, Music Education, Music Administration in Higher Learning, and Instrumental Music Guide. Harold gave a lifetime of service to his church, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints as bishop, stake president, as President of the England London Mission, in the presidency of the Provo Temple, and along with his wife Naomi, as President and Matron of the Atlanta, Georgia Temple, as Stake Patriarch in the Kansas City, Missouri Stake, and as a member of the Executive Committee of the Sunday School General Board. As Chairman of the Church Music Department, the hymnal used in the Church today was compiled and prepared under Harold's direction for use throughout the Church. Harold was dearly loved and admired by his wife Naomi and their three children, Steven, Gordon and Karen, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. After fifty-two years of teaching, leadership and service, Harold moved with his wife Naomi, to Missouri to assist with a family business. He continued to serve others until he finished his life's work at age 83 in June of 2007. Harold Goodman's legacy remains not only in his family, in his publications and contributions to the field of music, and in his service to others, but also in the inspiration and influence for good he was for thousands of students he taught over the years.

Ralph Woodward

Ralph Woodward

Ralph Woodward grew up on a farm outside of Blackfoot, Idaho. He graduated with a degree in music education from the University of Idaho and then taught in Idaho public schools. Later, he received a Master's Degree in Vocal Performance from the Cincinnati Conservatory of Music and subsequently taught several years at Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa. In 1955 he joined the BYU Music faculty where he taught voice, conducted the Women's Chorus, the College Choir, the Choral Union, and founded the Male Chorus (now the BYU Men's Chorus) and where he and his wife Margaret (a gifted soprano and voice teacher) would be fixtures for decades. In 1964, he received the first Doctor of Musical Arts Degree to be awarded by the University of Illinois School of Music and in the fall of that year, became director of the BYU A Cappella Choir. In 1968, he took that ensemble on the first international tour by a BYU Music Department organization, winning first prize in the Mixed Choir Competition at the prestigious International Choral Eisteddfod in Llangollen, Wales. The choir later traveled to Europe multiple times, as well as to Israel, where it consistently received high praise and glowing press reviews. During its international tours, it broke new ground in many ways (among other things, being the first non-Catholic choir to perform at Notre Dame Cathedral). Dr. Woodward and the A Cappella Choir were very prominent on the national scene, delivering highly acclaimed performances at Music Educators' National Conferences and conventions of the American Choral Directors' Association, and he was also much sought after as guest clinician and conductor in both the U.S. and Israel. He retired from BYU in 1984 but continued until 1994 as director of the Ralph Woodward Chorale, a fine community ensemble which he had organized in 1965. It had a vast repertoire but was perhaps most renowned for the dramatic authenticity of its annual presentations of Handel's complete "Messiah." He was guest conductor of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir's "Music and the Spoken Word" on three occasions and was Honoree of the 1992 Convention of the Western Division of the American Choral Directors' Association (held in Honolulu, Hawaii). Other forms of recognition include twice receiving the Karl G. Maeser Distinguished Teaching Award (at BYU), being named Utah Music Educator of the Year and receiving a Utah Chamber of Commerce's "Total Citizen" Award,"as well as awards from the Utah Valley Arts Council and the Provo-Orem Chamber of Commerce for outstanding contributions to the arts in Utah Valley. However, as significant as his public recognition and honors have been, Ralph Woodward's true legacy lies in his enduring positive influence in the lives of his many students, his associates, friends and his family.

Richard Marsden

Richard Marsden

Richard C. Marsden holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Brigham Young University and a Master of Music degree in Orchestral Conducting from the University of Utah. He was the string instructor and director of orchestras at Davis High School for seventeen years. His high aspirations and depth of musical understanding helped to create one of the finest High School Orchestras in the Western United States. In 1988, Mr. Marsden was appointed as Supervisor of Music Instruction for the Davis School District. He served in that position until retirement in 2009. Mr. Marsden is regularly sought after as a clinician and adjudicator throughout the Western United States. In addition to his work in the schools, Mr. Marsden teaches privately and is an accomplished cellist. Mr. Marsden has been named "Outstanding Music Educator" by the Davis School District and has been recognized by the Utah Music Educators Association for his "Outstanding Contribution" in music education in the state. Mr. Marsden served as President of the Utah Music Educators Association from 1995-2001. In 1994, Mr. Marsden was named the "Teacher of the Year: Music Education" by the American String Teachers Association, and recognized by the Utah State Office of Education for this accolade. In 2007, Mr. Marsden was recognized by the Utah Music Educators Association as the "Outstanding Music Educator of the Year" by the Utah High School Activities Association, and further received the Section Seven Award from the National Federation of High Schools, identifying him as the "Outstanding Music Educator of the Year" for Utah, Nevada, California, Arizona, and Hawaii. He and his lovely wife, Lana, have five children, and 10 grandchildren. His quips from the classroom live on in the lives of his grandchildren, who now affectionately refer to them as Grandpa-isms. They include such statements as: "Practicing is like brushing your teeth-you have to do it every day." "You don't need to be sick to get better." "A bad habit never disappears on its own-It's an undo-it-yourself project." "Your mother will always love you, but she'll like you better if you play in tune." And finally, "Music is what feelings sound like."

Wes Barry

Wes Barry

H. Wesley Barry was born in Grantsville, Utah in 2915. His mother passed away due to complication of his birth ten months later. He was raised by his paternal grandmother in Oakley, Idaho until he was six years old. He then joined his father, older brother and sister in Grantsville until they moved to Salt Lake City when Wes was eleven. After two weeks of getting harassed at school, he ran away from home and went back to Grantsville. He learned to play several instruments while in junior high and started his own dance band at the young age of fourteen. Following high school, he served in World War II on a ship in the Pacific. In 1947, after the war, Wes attended BYU and there met and married M. LaBelle Boley. He graduated from BYU in 1949. From 1946-1949, he was the leader of a popular dance band at BYU which then spread in popularity throughout the Western United States. The dance band continued through the 1970's. In fact, he made more income from playing for dances than he did from teaching school for many years. He began teaching band at Lincoln High School in Orem in 1950, and when the new Orem High School was built in 1956, he was its first "Leader of the Band." He taught there until 1983 when he retired for health reasons. Through the years he had other offers to teach elsewhere, but he enjoyed mentoring the students and preparing them for the future. For years, after retiring, students would write and thank him for the influence he had made in their lives. In 1999, hundreds of former band students honored him in a "Mr. Holland's Opus" type affair at Orem High. He received many Teacher-of-the-Year awards in both Alpine School District and the State of Utah. He was honored to teach and direct the All-State Band one year and direct the combined marching bands at BYU Band Days with all four of his children marching on the field, one in the Orem High Marching Band and three in the "Incomparable Cougar Marching Band." He was honored by Orem City in 1991 with the Arthur V. Watkins Outstanding Citizen Award for Outstanding Contribution to the Cultural Arts. He passed away in 2002 and is buried in the Orem Cemetery.

Susan Kenney

Susan Kenney

Susan Kenney has been a Utah music educator for forty-eight years; eleven in Granite School District K-6; thirty-seven at Brigham Young University. She served on the UMEA board as Elementary Vice President and as founding chair of Teachers of Elementary Classroom Music (TECM, 1992-2011). While this organization no longer exists, it helped raise awareness of the music education needs of Utah's classroom teachers. She was founding editor of TECM's The Musical Classroom, which offered ideas for classroom teachers in schools without music specialists. Kenney's passion for music in the classroom brought her to the attention of MENC (now NAfME) leaders, who named her to the organization's first executive committee for the Society for General Music. She was subsequently elected national chair of the Society. With UMEA support, she created the Music in Early Childhood day for Head Start teachers and other caregivers of young children, a program still featured at the annual UMEA teacher development conference. A column editor for MENC's General Music Today (2004-2014), Kenney authored twenty-six articles on early childhood music. She has also published articles, pamphlets and book chapters on elementary music education, and is a much sought-after lecturer and workshop presenter nationally and internationally. "I love music and I love kids," Kenney says. "Finding developmentally appropriate ways to empower children with music has been my life's mission, and I am so grateful for the many teachers and leaders who have given me direction, encouraged me, and supported my vision of music education for elementary and preschool children. And to UMEA, a special thanks for supporting me in so many ways over the years, and for this honor."

Inducted February, 2014

Dorothy Brown
Robert Campbell
Ferron Holt
Newell Weight
George Welch

February 2014 Inductee Bios:

Dorothy Brown Family

Dorothy Brown (1918 to 1985)

During her thirty-four and one-half years of teaching in Carbon County, Dorothy J. Brown set a standard for excellence and touched the lives of countless students and community members. Although she is primarily known for her legacy as a high school choral conductor, Mrs. Brown also taught at the elementary, junior high and college levels and also taught English for many years of her career. Assisted by her husband, Deane W. Brown, who taught music at the junior high, Mrs. Brown directed choirs that consistently took top awards in regional, state and multi‐state competitions. Whether at home, at school or in various church and civic settings, Mrs. Brown promoted a love of music throughout her community and the state. An excellent pianist and vocal coach, Dorothy also taught piano and voice lessons at home, in addition to preparing all sorts of groups for performances. Her influence was wide-spread as the community enjoyed operettas, musicals, vocal groups, solos and instrumental groups that Dorothy had helped to prepare. One of Dorothy's greatest community contributions was the annual production of Handel's Messiah for twenty-five consecutive years. Dorothy collaborated with other great leaders and musicians like Glen Fifield and Darrel Siggard, band instrumental directors; her husband, Deane Brown, and BYU professor Lawrence Sardoni, string leaders; assorted community and guest musicians; invited guest soloists and a choir of more than one hundred combined voices from the school and the community to provide a top rate production each year. Dorothy's love for music began at an early age when she learned to play both the piano and the oboe. One of her earliest awards, Winner of "First Group Rating," is from the Music Supervisors National Conference and the National Bureau for the Advancement of Music for an oboe solo in the Utah State and Intermountain Music Contest, held in Price, Utah, in 1934. Pursuing an education at BYU, Dorothy earned a double major, Bachelor of Arts in Music and in English. As an oboist in the university orchestra, she met her life-long companion, Deane, who was an excellent violinist. Throughout their lives, Deane and Dorothy literally made music together as she played the piano accompaniments for his many violin solos. Deane and Dorothy were loving parents of four musical children. Dorothy's title of mother extended beyond the bounds of her home, as her students also affectionately referred to her as "Mother" or "Mother Brown." Pursuing graduate studies, she earned a Master's of Arts in Musicology, also at BYU. As part of her thesis requirements, she transcribed some of the "Seven Penitential Psalms" from Renaissance composer, Alexander Utendal. Later in her career, Dorothy had one of her choirs perform some of the music from her thesis. Of the many awards and tokens of appreciation she received, she was most surprised and most honored when she was chosen as the "Outstanding Music Educator" for Utah in 1973. Later upon her retirement in May of 1979, the UMEA again honored her with a special Retiree's Award and plaque at the UMEA banquet that year. In June of 1975, the College of Eastern Utah recognized her with the CEU Founders Day Award and presented her with an honorary Associate of Arts degree. Her other civic awards include an award as the First Lady of Price by the Beta Sigma Phi Sorority in May of 1958 and the Price Chamber of Commerce Distinguished Service Awards in May of 1969. In her church service, Dorothy served many years in music-related capacities, culminating with a calling from the First Presidency of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, as a Church Regional Music Director. Posthumously, Mrs. Brown and her husband Deane were again recognized in 2002 by CEU when the Deane W. and Dorothy J. Brown Music Building was named in their honor. Dorothy dared to have a dream and seldom took "no" as a final answer. When she was told that there was no money for choir robes or choir trips, she found ways to raise the money. She frequently approached non-choir students in the hallways to invite them to be part of her choirs that often exceeded seventy voices. Through her efforts, she received invitations for her choirs and students to participate in all-conference choirs throughout the West: Berkeley, Pasadena, Santa Monica, Long Beach, Bakersfield, Las Vegas, San Diego, and Tucson. During the 1960's, Dorothy approached Maestro Maurice Abravanel about the possibility of a joint performance of the Utah Symphony with select Utah high school choirs (including hers). After first rejecting and then later reconsidering the idea, Maestro Abravanel eventually agreed. In one of the yearly concerts that followed, Maestro Abravanel praised Mrs. Brown for her vision of the wonderful tradition that she helped initiate. In her memoirs, Dorothy relates a lesson she learned early in her teaching career: "I realized that you teach the child, not the subject. I found out how important a one-on-one relationship is with students." Even though her largest choir exceeded ninety students, each student felt Dorothy's concern with him or her as an individual. She embraced students from all walks of life and inspired them to "reach for something like a star," rather than accept the second-best. Not surprisingly, many of her students pursued careers in education or music education. All of her students felt the influence of a great teacher who was not afraid to have a dream.

Robert H. Campbell

Robert H. Campbell

One never knows where any single event may lead in one's life. For example, who knew where it would lead when in the late 1940s, a man knocked at the door of the Campbell home in Orem, Utah, offering to teach children in that home music lessons on the Hawaiian steel guitar. Bob Campbell didn’t know where it would lead when a few years later, Wes Barry (band director at Lincoln Junior High) handed him a pair of 2B drum sticks, a practice pad made by nailing a piece of tire rubber to a block of wood and a copy of a band method called "A Tune A Day for Drums." A few months later, the Campbell family moved from Orem to Spanish Fork where Bob met his new band director, Bob Evans, who ignited in Bob an interest in the drum set and in jazz. During this same time, Bob's guitar teacher, Grace Herger, had Bob begin to teach private lessons at her guitar and accordion studio in Provo. The seeds were planted. The love of music and the joy of sharing it with others were beginning to sprout. Those seeds were nourished as Bob attended Summer Music Clinics at BYU where he was exposed to the influence of Lawrence Sardoni and Ralph Laycock. This eventually led to enrollment in the BYU music department where Bob suspects that he was the first music major to graduate with percussion as a major instrument. Additional influences during his BYU days were William Johnson (principal percussionist with the Utah Symphony Orchestra) and Dow Young, with whom Bob student-taught at East High School in Salt Lake City. Late in his time at BYU, Bob began to perform in the percussion section of the Utah Symphony and as a freelance percussionist in the Salt Lake area. Horace Mann Junior High in Salt Lake was Bob's first teaching job. After two years, Bob returned to BYU as a graduate assistant teaching the percussion methods class for music educators and private lessons. He remained at BYU for eight years as a full time adjunct instructor, making Bob BYU's first percussion instructor. During this time, along with Newell Dayley, Bob helped to develop BYU's jazz program, including leading the jazz band that eventually became known as Synthesis. The seeds of involvement in UMEA were planted during this time when Bob was appointed the association's first Jazz Vice-President. That involvement continued for many years, including service as business manager of the UMEA magazine and eventually a term as UMEA President. Following his time at BYU, Bob accepted employment as band director at South Davis Junior High School in Bountiful, Utah where he remained for thirty years. For twenty-five of those years, Bobs wife Gloria also taught there. Since their home was within the SDJH boundaries, their five sons somehow managed to survive having Mom and Dad as teachers. The family still has a big soft spot in their hearts for that school. During this time, many other marvelous teachers and musicians had influence on Bob. He is deeply grateful to Wayne James, Max Dalby, Doug Wolf, Lowell Hepworth and Jan Hyde, all of who have had major influences on Bob's musical and teaching development. Special mention should be made of two individuals, Steve Allen (Bountiful High School and later Southern Utah State College) and Steve Richins, (Woods Cross High School). The two Steves were both totally unique individuals with enormous special gifts as teachers. Their style and integrity did much to shape Bob's approach to teaching. Steve Richins' influence also extended to each of the Campbell boys, all of whom have been inflicted to one degree or another with the music and teaching diseases. Currently, Bob and his wife Gloria are enjoying retirement by being involved with the Mormon Tabernacle Choir and Orchestra at Temple Square where they are music librarians for the orchestra, and Bob is percussion section leader. Also, Bob is attempting to pass the torch by supervising music student teachers placed along the Wasatch Front by BYU-Idaho. Bob has this to say about his career: "I can't believe that my teaching career now spans six decades. One of my greatest satisfactions is to meet former students and have them launch into a description of the involvement of their children in music. That helps me know that I was able to pass on the understanding that music can make anyone's life better. To all those mentioned above as influences (and many others too numerous to mention), I am deeply grateful for preparing me to be a link in the chain of life that helps those who follow to taste the sweetness of involvement with music. Finally, thanks to my many students for all that you have taught me."

Ferron Holt

Ferron Holt

Ferron W. Holt is currently serving as the Coordinator of Fine Arts Programs K-12 for the Washington School District in St. George, Utah, a position he has held since 1998. He graduated from Southern Utah State College (now known as Southern Utah University) in 1975 with a Bachelor of Arts in Music and Spanish. He went on to earn a Master of Arts in 1982 from Utah State University and a Secondary Education Administration Endorsement from USU in 1984. His teaching experience began at Delta High School 1975-80. From 1980-98, he taught at schools in Washington School District, having experience with grades 7-12. His groups have received numerous awards at region and state festivals as well as Marching Band competitions. He is proud to have 19 former students who are now music educators. Ferron has received many awards both in college and for his teaching, including SUU Outstanding Music Education and Teacher Education Graduate (1975), Outstanding Teacher Award from Millard County Schools (1979), Washington County School District Outstanding Teacher Award (1984). In 1985, Ferron was honored by the Utah State Legislature for "Outstanding Service to Education." He has received several awards from the Utah Music Educators Association, including Presidential Award (200), Outstanding Music Educator Award (2004), Outstanding Administrator Award (2005). He received the Outstanding Music Educator award for Region 7 from the National Federation of High Schools in 2007 and in 2008 was honored with Governor Huntsman's "State of Utah Arts Leadership Award." In 2012, Mr. Holt was recognized with the "Partner in The Arts Award" from the city of St. George and in 2013 was named "Utah Art Supporter of the Year" by the Utah Artist Education Association and a Lifetime Achievement award from the Sorenson Legacy Foundation. "I am deeply honored and humbled to be nominated to the Utah Music Educators Association Hall of Fame. Thirty-nine years ago, I thought I knew it all coming out of the music teacher education program at SUSC. That's when reality set in and, in the first months of teaching in Millard County at Delta High School, I cried "Uncle." Dr. Avery Glenn, Dr. Derral Siggard, Dr. Max Dalby, Dr. Newell Dayley and Wayne James came to the rescue. They not only came to the rescue, they stayed at my home, spent hours in my classes and tutored me through two very stressful years. They monitored, visited and served as clinicians to the struggling program and teacher. I would have never survived without them or their kind words, wisdom, mentoring and expertise. Their tutelage has paid huge dividends for me and the programs I have been able to work with."
"Now at the close of my career I am pleased to visit with many peers, colleagues and students that I have had the pleasure of working alongside in our efforts to the noble cause of Music Education. It is a great profession and those involved are some of the most passionate and dedicated professionals in any field. I am forever grateful for the challenges, opportunities, experiences and kinships in which I have had the privilege to participate. It's not the POSITION, it's the PASSION. Show it with class."

Newell B. Weight Family

Newell Weight

Newell Bryan Weight was born Aug. 1, 1916 in Springville, Utah. He married the love of his life, Dorothy Hill, on July 20, 1936. He was a member of the Good Sam's Club and the Golden Kiwanis Club. He loved the out-of-doors, hunting, fishing and riding horses. He graduated from Brigham Young University with a Master's Degree in Music Education. He furthered his education by earning his Doctorate in Music from USC. Newell worked at BYU from 1949 to 1962. While there, he founded the BYU A cappella Choir. In 1962, he moved to the University of Utah and expanded and refined their A cappella Choir. While at the University of Utah, his choirs received two Grammy nominations, and he served as the Chairman of the Music Department. He was known throughout the music community for his achievements in conducting choirs. He retired in 1984 from the University of Utah. His artistic musical ability has touched the lives of many and he will be remembered for his dedication and love of music.

George Welch

George Welch

Most of who George Welch has become is the direct result of music. He was raised in a family where music was important. He sang as a child, participated in both the band and the choir in high school and was without question, Max Dalby's worst euphonium player at Utah State University. He graduated with a Bachelor of Music degree in 1966 and returned to his home state of Wyoming where he taught both vocal and instrumental music for the next four years. He was then provided an opportunity to return to Utah State where he earned a Master of Music degree, serving as a graduate assistant to Dr. William Ramsey with emphasis in choral conducting. It was near this time that he became the director of the Salt Lake Symphonic Choir where he served for the next 31 years. The choir toured throughout many of the "States," made six trips to four of the provinces of Canada and spent nearly two weeks in Armenia and Russia performing concerts throughout both countries. George was even provided an opportunity to play Tchaikovsky's piano, which was kept under constant lock and key in the basement of a museum in St. Petersburg. His teaching career in Utah was largely at Murray and Bingham High schools. After teaching for a number of years, he spent 8 years as the Coordinator of Fine Arts for the Jordan School District, and it was during this assignment that he served as President of UMEA and as President of the Utah Chapter of the American Choral Directors Association. George was provided the opportunity of conducting the Utah All-State Choir in 1987. He directed the Wyoming All-State Choir in 1990, and in 1991, he directed the Utah All-State Men's Choir. He was a guest soloist and director of the Utah State University band 1992 and was the guest conductor of the Salt Lake Symphony in 1995. In 1996, he was the Director of the Centennial concert series in Salt Lake City and Washington D.C., where the Symphonic Choir sang for the lighting of the National Christmas tree on the lawn of the White House. Additionally, George has served as a high school assistant principal, high school principal and as the Executive Director of Human Resources for the Jordan School District. During each of these assignments, he served as the administrative representative to the region music committees where he could stay close to those important activities at the school, region and state level. He served as the Chair of the Music Committee for the Utah High School Activities Association on several occasions (for more years that he can remember). He has been active as a festival adjudicator, judging in five different states. He can say without question that the performance level of the bands, orchestras and choirs in Utah are better than the vast majority of the groups he had heard. George is an original inductee into the Bingham High School Hall of Fame (1977). He was honored as Utah's Outstanding Music Educator in 1986, was selected for the Brighton High School Wall of Fame in 2000 and was awarded the Music Educator of the Year award by the Utah High School Activities Association in 2002. In 2003, he was honored by the University of Utah for Excellence in Educational Leadership and was awarded the Section 7 Outstanding Music Educator by the National Federation of High Schools in 2003. In 2005, George was inducted into the Utah High School Activities Association Circle of Fame and in 2010 was inducted into the National High School Hall of Fame. "Music education: where everyone gets to play and no one loses, where teachers and students take the same risks. It is a place where students learn important life skills of discipline, of challenge, of learning to be a part of a group where the whole is far more important than any single individual. It is a place where refinement, so missing in today's society, is taught. It is a class where students remember their teachers with love and respect because of the experiences they shared together. For George Welch, a little boy from Wyoming, none of this would have happened if it weren't for the constant support of my family and by the opportunities provided to me by my friends, the music educators of Utah. For this, I will forever be humbled and grateful beyond description."

Inducted February, 2013

Alvin Wardle
Glen Fifield
Carl Ashby

February 2013 Inductee Bios:

Alvin Wardle

Alvin Wardle

Alvin Wardle was born in Idaho Falls, Idaho on March 5, 1928. He worked for the Union Pacific Railroad while attending high school in Pocatello, Idaho. He joined the army before graduation and served in an army band in Germany for most of two years. Upon returning home, he enrolled at Brigham Young University where he became re-acquainted with Mary Elizabeth Gibbs, who he had met in the orchestra while in high school. They were married July 28, 1950. They have two children, Lindalee (deceased) and John. Alvin graduated from BYU in 1951 with a degree in German and taught English for two years in Delco, Idaho. Alvin attended Utah State University to pursue a Master of Education degree under John Phillip Dalby. During his time at USU, he became a member of the Summer Music Clinic staff and played in the Directors' Band, which later became the USU Alumni Band. From 1954 to 1959, he was Director of Bands in the Carbon County Schools and at the College of Eastern Utah. In 1959, Dr. Max Dalby invited Al to assist with the bands at Utah State University. He also served as brass instructor, associate and acting head of the Music Department, chairman of Music Education and Curriculum and director of the Summer Music Clinic for 26 years. He was a senator from the College of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences in the USU Faculty Senate for six years. In 1969, he completed doctoral studies at Florida State University where a former student, Dr. Clifford Madsen, was head of experimental research in music. Dr. Wardle was elected as president-elect of the Utah Music Educators Association and then became president in 1979. He has also served as Research and Higher Education Representative and served as the editor for a short term. In 1981, he was presented the UMEA Outstanding Music Educator award. In 2011, he received the Utah State University Alumni Merit Citation.
Comment: "When I climbed the mountain, I did not reach the top. I found a niche that suited me. I stopped to rest with a wonderful view. In retrospect, I saw the love of students, family, friends and respected colleagues. Thank you all at UMEA for the honor of being part of your family."

Glenn Fifield

Glen Fifield

Glen Fifield began a life-long profession in music 64 years ago, September 1949, as a freshman at Idaho State College, Pocatello, Idaho. A two-year LDS mission, two years military service in the US Army, a marriage and two children later, Glen graduated from Idaho State University with a Bachelor's Degree in Music Education (June 1956). Glen's first teaching position was at Alameda Jr. High School in Pocatello where he taught band and orchestra for a half day while he was still a senior student at ISU. He taught three more years at Alameda before going to Price, Utah in 1959 where he and Derral Siggard co-directed the Carbon County School District band program for 8 years. This included Carbon High School, Price and Helper Jr. High Schools and 6 grade schools. The scope and quality of the Carbon School District music program attracted state, regional and national attention. Glen taught music at the College of Eastern Utah one year before joining the music faculty at Utah State University (September, 1968). He retired from USU in 1993, 25 years later, having taught music education at every level, pre-school age through college. Glen learned early in his career that much of the most important training to be a successful music teacher came from professional music organizations. Summers were basically spent attending conferences, clinics, workshops, band camps and working on advanced degrees. Glen completed his Master's Degree at Utah State University in 1961. He was 50 years old before completing his Doctorate Degree in Music Education at Arizona State University (May, 1980). When the need to serve in leadership positions came, Glen took his turn. Utah Music Educators Association (UMEA): President-Elect, President, Past President, 1971-1976; Vice President, Band Division, 1965-1968; Vice President, Elementary Music Division, 1984-1987. National Band Association (NBA: Utah State Chapter President, 1968-1978. American Orff Schulwerk Association (AOSA); Utah Chapter AOSA founder and president, 1990-1992.
Glen has been asked many times: If you were starting over again, would you be a music educator? The answer has always been the same: "Yes," without hesitation. "Where else can one work with bright young people to help them appreciate and produce something that brings so much beauty and happiness into the world? Where else can one work with colleagues who are dedicated to improving the lives of others through music?"

Carl Ashby

Carl Ashby

Carl Ashby taught choirs at Bear River High School in Tremonton, Utah for 36 years and one year at Northridge High School in the Davis School district. He was a member of the world-renowned Mormon Tabernacle Choir for 12 years and on March 21, 1999, he was invited to be guest conductor for the international broadcast of Music and the Spoken Word. As a member of this choir, he participated in many tours, including concerts in Japan, Russia, New Zealand, Austria, Germany, France, England, Israel and the United States. In 1990, Mr. Ashby was honored by his own state to direct the Utah All-State Choir with over 700 high school students. He also directed the State Men's Honor Choir and State Junior High School Honor Choir. He has been guest conductor or clinician and adjudicator for honor or festival choirs in Wyoming, Idaho, Colorado, Montana, Nevada, California and Utah. He has received numerous awards, the Distinguished Service Award from Utah High School Activities Association, the National Federation Interscholastic Music Educator Award and the Music Educator of the Year Award from the Utah Music Educators Association. Mr. Ashby is known and respected statewide by students, parents, teachers and administrators in all levels of education. His wife Barbara has been his biggest fan and support throughout his career. Mr. Ashby has served on the Utah Arts Council, The UMEA Executive Board and currently directs the Bear River Community Chorale.
He believes that a man should have a little music, read a little poetry and see a fine picture every day of his life in order that worldly cares may not obliterate the sense of the beautiful which God has implanted in the human soul.

Inducted February 2012

K. Newell Dayley
Bernell Hales
Wayne James
LeAnna Willmore

February 2012 Inductee Bios:

K. Newell Dayley

K. Newell Dayley

Dr. Dayley is emeritus professor of music at BYU where he served for 39 years. His baccalaureate degree was in music education (BYU), followed by a master's degree in trumpet performance (USC), and a doctorate in brass performance and pedagogy (UNC). For a number of years, he performed often with the Utah Symphony as a recitalist and in a variety of professional venues. He was a faculty member at the National Music Camp in Interlochen, Michigan. At BYU, he taught trumpet, music theory, arranging, orchestration, media composition and music business. His extensive experience as a conductor and director included band, orchestra, musicals, brass ensembles and jazz ensembles. He established BYU's award-winning jazz ensemble, Synthesis. As a composer, he as published numerous songs, hymns, choral settings, musicals and a few large-scale commissioned compositions. Among his administrative assignments, Dr. Dayley served as music department chair, dean, and associate academic vice president at BYU. For many years, he was an active member of MENC and served the UMEA in a number of assignments, including director of the State Solo and Ensemble Festival, President-Elect and President. During most of his teaching career, he served often as an adjudicator and clinician in Utah and adjacent states. His work as an arts advocate has included service as chair of the Provo Arts Council and chair of the Utah Arts Council. He was chair of the advisory board for the Promised Valley Playhouse for a decade and currently serves on the board of the Hale Center Theatre in West Valley City. After retirement, Dr. Dayley and his wife Diane served volunteer assignments at BYU Idaho for a couple of years, where he enjoyed another opportunity to teach trumpet, jazz, composition and songwriting. He recently came out of retirement to serve as Dean of the School of the Arts at Utah Valley University.

Bernell Hales Family

Bernell Hales

Bernell W. Hales was a native of Salt Lake City and a graduate of West High School. He received his BA from the University of Utah, his MA from Columbia University and his EdD from the University of Oregon. Dr. Hales' teaching experience spanned nearly 40 years, beginning in 1948 at Uintah High School in Vernal, Utah and continuing at the Steward School (the University of Utah's campus training school), Central Junior High and Granger high School, all in his native city. Dr. Hales served as supervisor of elementary and secondary vocal music in the Granite School District for five years and then was appointed to the music education faculty at the University of Utah in 1965. During his tenure at the University, he developed and perfected the unique character of the deservedly famous Chamber Choir, transforming that ensemble into one of unparalleled virtuosity. The Chamber Choir toured extensively throughout the western United States, Hawaii and Mexico and appeared at the Western Division Convention of the Music Educators National Conference. Through frequent performances of the Chamber Choir, Dr. Hales added to his reputation as an arranger, taking on a stature of legendary proportion. For the Chamber Choir, he wrote more than 40 arrangements of folk songs and popular ballads. He was in constant demand as a clinician and adjudicator throughout the Intermountain Region and was also conductor of the Utah All-State Choir in 1979. He conducted touring choirs in Mexico and Europe, the most recent was in 1986 when the University Choir, comprising members of both the Chamber Choir and the A Cappella Choir, toured England, France, Switzerland, Italy, Austria and Germany. Dr. Hales was given the Utah Music Educators Associations Superior Accomplishment award in 1979 and the Music Educator of the Year award in 1988. Dr. Hales retired from the University of Utah in 1987.

Wayne James

Wayne James

Wayne James was a decorated fighter pilot in World War II, flying 63 missions in the European theater. Returning home from the war, Wayne married Ruth Bowen, a cellist who had caught his eye in orchestra class at South Cache High School. He graduated from Utah State Agricultural College in Logan in 1946. He began teaching music in Oakley, Idaho before moving to Buhl where for two years, his band was judged to be the #1 marching band in the state of Idaho. While living in Buhl, Wayne completed his Master of Education degree at USU. He taught music and band at Minidonka High School in Rupert, Idaho before moving to Bountiful, Utah in 1959. In Bountiful, Wayne taught at Bountiful High School, Bountiful Junior High School and South Davis Junior High School. In 1966, he was appointed Music Supervisor for the Davis County School District. Wayne was a great organizer of music competitions, marching festivals (his love of tennis influenced his naming the Davis marching band invitational the "Davis Cup"), and solo and ensemble festivals. In 1975-76, he served as President of the Utah Music Educators Association. He was well known throughout the state for his musical and organizational abilities. K. Newell Dayley, Chairman of the BYU Music Department at the time, wrote to Wayne on April 14, 1988, "As I observed your work last Saturday during the State Solo and Ensemble Festival, I had some feelings that I wished to express. Over the years, your integrity and hard work have been a great source of strength in my life, having first heard of you and admired your work when I was a high school student in Southern Idaho. Your influence on music education in the State of Utah has been pervasive and I feel to express my appreciation to you for your untiring efforts." To quote Wayne, "Life has taught me that there are no possessions remotely equal to good health, good friends, good attitudes and a good wife. I have found music to be a tonic, an inspiration, a prayer, a release and an impossible goal."

LeAnna Willmore

LeAnna Willmore

LeAnna Willmore recently retired after thirty-nine years of teaching music in Utah at Valley Jr. high School, Bonneville High School, Bingham High School, Riverton High School and Herriman High School. She earned a Bachelor of Science Degree from Weber State University and a Master of Music Degree from the University of Utah. She has been a guest conductor for several honor choirs, and she is a frequent adjudicator in and out of state. Mrs. Willmore is a past-president of the Western Division for the National Association for Music Education (NAfME) and of the Utah Music Educators Association (UMEA). She also served on many committees and acted as the All-State Chair for UMEA for over 20 years. She is the current NAfME Choral Education Chair. At the latter part of her teaching, she served as the only teacher on the Board of Directors of WestEd, a National Education Research and Development agency. Mrs. Willmore was awarded the 2002 National Music Educator Citation by the National Federation of High Schools, the 2001 Section 7 Outstanding Music Teacher award and the 2000 Outstanding Music Educator award by the Utah high School Activities Association. Mrs. Willmore was the Choral Director for the Utah Ambassadors of Music for six tours to Europe. She has received many awards, including the 1998 Jordan District Teacher of the Year and finalist for the State Teacher of the Year, plus a 2009 KUED/State PTA Golden Apple Award and the Huntsman Outstanding Teacher Award. She and her husband Ken reside in Bountiful, Utah, and they have two boys.
"I am grateful for the role music has played in my career and life. I feel deeply about music and what it can do in the education setting to change lives for the better. The beauty, inspiration and culture, mixed together with discipline and hard work, have endless rewards. Some of my best memories are of those magic moments when my choirs have been moved to tears. I have appreciated my colleagues in UMEA for sharing ideas, giving me opportunities for leadership and friendship. I will continue to do my part to further Music Education."



Inducted February 2011

Max Dalby
Robert Frost
Ralph Laycock

February 2011 Bios:

Max Dalby

Max F. Dalby

Max F. Dalby received a bachelor's degree from Brigham Young University, a master's degree from San Diego State University, and a doctorate from Utah State University. He was the principal clarinetist in the early years of the Utah Symphony. During three years of military service, he conducted the 249th Army Ground Forces Band in the Canal Zone, Panama. He was the instrumental music director of the San Diego Diocese School System, 1946-1950; Cyprus High School, 1950-1951; Ogden High School, 1951-1955 and Weber College, 1955-1957. From 1957-1985, Dr. Dalby served as a faculty member at Utah State University. While there, he was the coordinator of music education, director of bands, head of the music department, conductor of the USU Symphony Orchestra, co-founder and conductor of the Cache Chamber Orchestra and founder and conductor of the USU Alumni Band. Dr. Dalby received the Distinguished Service Award from USU, and in 1994 was named the Utah State's "Alumnus of the Year." He served as president of UMEA and as Western Division President of MENC. He was a conductor, clinician and adjudicator in 25 states, Canada and Europe. Throughout his career, he gave thousands of private music lessons. Max was married to Betty Marler for 50 years, and they became the parents of nine children. After Betty's death, he married Marjorie Crow. They lived in Salt Lake City until his death in 2005.

Robert Frost

Robert S. Frost

My first experience with music was singing in LDS Primary. Piano lessons followed and shortly thereafter, I began violin instruction in an elementary school. I had excellent teachers who nurtured my interest and skill in music that resulted in my pursuing a music career. As a graduate of Utah State University, Ralph Matesky, Max Dalby and Alvin Wardle mentored me. I taught orchestra at the elementary and secondary level in the Cache County Schools for 30 years. An interest in composing, that lay dormant in my youth, was activated in my early years of teaching and resulted in my first published work in 1974. Two string curriculums, various technical books, books of ensembles and numerous original and arranged works for strings and other instruments have followed. A DME from the University of Northern Colorado in 1997 motivated attention toward research and writing for professional journals. I have a deep and abiding love for music, music teaching and music making. I have seen how music has enriched and transformed lives. There is a power in music that is endless and ageless. It is all powerful - from providing comfort and peace to motivating and inspiring us to achieve our potential. I believe it is God-given, and we are not complete as human beings without music in our lives. I am so thankful that I have had, and continue to have, the opportunity to enjoy all aspects of music from teaching and performing to composing and listening. Its power compels me to carry on; the journey is not yet complete.

Ralph Laycock

Ralph G. Laycock

Ralph George Laycock was born in 1920 in Raymond, Alberta, Canada and died at age 86, April 4, 2006 in Provo, Utah. In 1941, he earned a Bachelor of Arts from Brigham Young University. In 1948, he earned a Master of Science Degree in Orchestral Conducting from Juilliard School of Music. He completed a Doctor of Musical Arts Degree with an emphasis on Musical Performance (conducting) at the University of Southern California in 1969. Dr. Laycock began his life in music early, learning to play clarinet, sax and trumpet from his father. He organized his own dance band at age twelve. He later served in the Royal Canadian Air Force Concert Band during WW II as a musician and bandmaster. During the 1948-49 season, Dr. Laycock performed with the Utah Symphony, playing at various times eight different instruments. Maestro Maurice Abravanel called him his "utility infielder." He also played professionally in venues such as the Pioneer Memorial Theatre and the Valley Music Hall. Dr. Laycock was an educator, always striving to help musicians reach their greatest potential. After teaching woodwinds at Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa, he returned to Provo, Utah and Brigham Young University as Director of Bands, conducting the Concert Band and other small ensembles. He later conducted the BYU Wind Symphony, Philharmonic Orchestra and Chamber Orchestras, touring with his students throughout the United States, Canada, and China. The BYU bands, under his direction, appeared, by invitation, at two national music conventions (MENC and CBDNA). The orchestras appeared, by invitation, at two national and three division conventions (MENC). An audio tape of the BYU Philharmonic concert, Spring, 1978, was selected for nation-wide broadcast by National Public Radio, one of thirteen chosen from the entire United States for a limited series of broadcasts. Dr. Laycock frequently adjudicated musical groups at state festivals and guest-conducted All-State orchestras and bands in the western states and Hawaii. He was a music consultant at many high schools and junior high schools, conducting workshops and clinics. For several years, Dr. Laycock wrote a conducing column for the magazine The Instrumentalist. He wrote numerous arrangements for bands, orchestras, choral groups, LDS church pageants and small ensembles. He also wrote the arrangements for the first edition of the Simplified Hymns. Dr. Laycock conducted the Utah Valley Symphony for twelve seasons, concerts in the park with the Provo Municipal Band for twenty-three seasons, and he directed numerous Broadway musicals, operas, oratorios, ballets and Messiah sing-ins. In 1951, Dr. Laycock was elected to the honorary performers fraternity, Pi Kappa Lambda. In 1971, he was chosen by BYU to give the Annual Distinguished Faculty Lecture, using the Philharmonic Orchestra in a lecture/demonstration of the subject, "Conductors - Who Needs Them? and Why?" He repeated the presentation, slightly modified, as a BYU forum address in 1973. In 1971, he received the BYU Master Teacher Award, and in 1985, the BYU Professor of the Year Award. In 1984, the Utah Music Educators Association presented Dr. Laycock with the "Outstanding Music Educator" award. And in 1985, the UMEA organization presented him with another award that reads, "Dr. Laycock - for Outstanding Service to Music in the State of Utah, UMEA, 1985." Dr. Laycock strove for excellence and was a hard-working man of integrity. He and his wife, Lucy Tanner Laycock, are parents to five daughters.

Inducted February, 2010

Avery Glenn
Gordon Jessop
James A. Mason
Darrell Siggard
Jeneile Tams

February 2010 Inductee Bios:

Avery Glenn

Avery L. Glenn

Dr. Avery L. Glenn graduated from high school in Union, Oregon and attended Brigham Young University on a music scholarship. Avery graduated from BYU in 1951, earning his Bachelor degree in music. He taught music in Deaver and Byron, Wyoming his first five years and earned a Master of Music degree from the University of Oregon. In 1956, he accepted a teaching position in Billings, Montana where he taught band and was appointed Supervisor of Music for the Billings Public Schools in 1967. While in Billings, he organized the State Music Festival, served as President of the Montana Music Educators Association, 1966-68; President of the Northwest Division of the Music Educators National Conference; and a member of the MENC National Executive Board, 1969-71. In 1971, he accepted a position as an Assistant Professor of Music at BYU. He taught music education classes and supervised student teachers. As Chairman of the Utah Valley Chapter Young Audiences Incorporated, 1972-73, he helped provide musical concerts in elementary schools throughout Utah County. On Jan. 1, 1974, Avery accepted a position in Salt Lake City as the Music Education Specialist for the State Office of Education. In April 1978, he received a Doctorate in Education from BYU. In 1987, he received the Distinguished Service Award from the Utah High School Activities Association for helping strengthen music festivals and adjudication. In 1994, he received an Honorary Life Membership from the Congress of Parent Teachers for his involvement in the Reflections Program. He also received the Outstanding Music Award from the Utah Music Educators Association that same year. Upon retirement in 1994, Avery was honored by BYU as a Distinguished Alumni. He delivered a lecture at the Harris Fine Arts Center entitled, "Why The Arts Are Important For Everyone" and shared his experiences in teaching and supervising music. "One of the important reasons we should value music is its contribution to our emotional and spiritual well-being. The human spirit in all its manifestations is central to music. Years ago, Avery was rehearsing his high school band in a selection entitled 'American Civil War Fantasy' arranged by Jerry Bilik. The selection consisted of different patriotic songs and ended with a portion of 'The Battle Hymn of the Republic.' During the rehearsal, all of the musical elements came together to create a perfect performance. A silence came over the students after they played the last note. They sat there knowing that something special had taken place. Two of the first clarinet players had tears running down their cheeks." It was a great emotional and spiritual experience for Avery and his students.

Gordon Jessop

Gordon Jessop

Gordon Jessop's career in music education spanned 46 years from 1961 to 2007. The first 15 years were in the public schools and included 2 years in Cokeville, Wyoming, 3 years at T.H. Bell Junior in Ogden (band, choir, general music and art), and 10 years at Roy High School (band and choir). For 9 years, he was brass section leader for the Golden Spike Youth Symphony Orchestras and was also the Weber District Music Coordinator for Secondary Schools for 4 years. During these public school years, Mr. Jessop completed a Master's degree at Utah State University and an Educational Specialist Degree in administration and supervision at the University of Utah. He also served as Business Manager for the Utah Music Educator Magazine and as President-Elect and President of UMEA. The next 31 years of Gordon's career path were spent at BYU where he completed a Ph.D. in music and taught more than 20 different courses in music and teacher education. Along the way, Gordon was Area Coordinator for Music Education for 17 years, Graduate Coordinator for 2 years, advisor to the student MENC chapter for 5 years and Editor of the Utah Music Educator for 5 years. He also supervised numerous student teachers and was advisor for many graduate students. A common thread through all of these experiences was Gordon's desire to find more effective and efficient ways to improve learning experiences for students and teachers. This endeavor required persistent introspection, observation and expenditure of energy in the attempt to gain a deeper understanding of human motivation and the kind of relationships, conditions and curricula that contribute to the success and fulfillment of teachers and students. Over time, four fundamental beliefs emerged among the myriad complexities that comprise the teaching/learning process. First, the relationships between teacher, students and the subject must be infused with genuine caring and respect, conviction of the value of the endeavor, and the teacher and students must be on the same side of the challenge. Second, the teacher must develop a clear vision of the purpose of schools and of the importance of the subject being taught. Third, because performance groups seldom, if ever, surpass the teacher's level of understanding, ability and effort, he or she must continually be striving to learn and improve. And fourth, essential skills leading to individual musical independence must be woven into the instructional process while striving to achieve excellence and musicality in the performance of appropriate literature. The journey as a music educator has been good and, surprisingly, the joys and rewards of teaching have been similar at all levels and in all areas of instruction. They have accrued primarily as a result of meaningful interactions with students and colleagues and from getting a glimpse of the potential of individuals or groups and helping them to become aware of and to progress toward achieving that potential. Gordon shares the honor that is being extended to him by the UMEA to all who have influenced his development, and he expresses his gratitude for the relationships and experiences that have occurred while tumbling together in the great refining lapidary of life in the music education profession.

James Mason

James A. Mason

Thank you for selecting me as one of the Hall of Fame recipients. I am most appreciative of the UMEA for giving me the opportunity to serve. Editing the Utah Music Educator magazine and winning awards resulted in my becoming editor of The Instrumentalist, a monthly magazine for band and orchestra directors. Through this experience, I learned more about music education in the nation. The job as editor came after five years of teaching band and two years on the BYU's music department faculty. After a couple of years, I left to complete a doctoral degree. On returning to BYU, I spent the next years teaching and administrating in the Music Department. The last eleven years were spent as Dean of the College of Fine Arts and Communications. During the years at BYU, I was a visiting professor at Indiana University, University of Texas, Northwestern University, and Cincinnati College Conservatory. While at BYU I was active in UMEA/MENC. I served on the Music Education Research Council for six years and wrote a research news column for the Journal of Research in Music Education. I was elected President of MENC Western Division and later MENC National President. With this assignment, I traveled and spoke on music education throughout MENC's six divisions, also in China and Europe. Attending the White House briefings on the International Year of the Child and testifying at a Congressional Committee meeting were some of my exciting duties. With all my responsibilities, I tried to represent UMEA as effectively as I could. I am grateful to UMEA/MENC for all the rich learning experiences.

Darrell Siggard

Derral Siggard

I grew up in Brigham City, where I was involved in both the instrumental and vocal music programs. In 1966, I graduated from Utah State University as a music major. After doing student teaching, I taught the last part of the year at Lewiston Jr. High and then went to Pocatello, Idaho to teach woodwinds and play in the military band. This lasted two years, and then the military band was shut down so I looked for a music teaching job in Utah. Alvin Wardle had been teaching the bands in Carbon County and had made good progress, but he was offered a teaching position at USU as their brass instructor. Taking this position with the Carbon School district seemed to be the best choice. Since they had a big enough program for two teachers, Glen Fifield, who was also teaching in Pocatello, decided to join me in this teaching position. We had nine wonderful years with the Carbon School District. The program really grew with the work of both a brass and woodwind teacher at the high school. We also taught band at two junior high schools and several 6th grade beginning band programs. The Carbon High School band program became one of the best in the Western States. It was the first band in Utah to march in the Rose Parade in Pasadena, California (1966). The Carbon Marching Band also marched in the International Lion’s convention parade in Chicago, Illinois. The Carbon Symphonic Band regularly received superior ratings in region and state festivals during the 1960's. In 1969, Glen Fifield was selected by my clarinet teacher, Max Dalby, to be the trumpet teacher at Utah State University, and I moved into the Instrumental Music job at the College of Eastern Utah in Price. I had a wonderful teaching experience there, and one of my clarinet students, Wayne Erickson, became an outstanding teacher at Utah Valley Community College and served as state president of the UMEA. After teaching at CEU for five years, I was given a sabbatical leave for one year. We went to Eugene, Oregon to get a doctorate at the University of Oregon in clarinet performance. This was also a wonderful experience. I finished all of the class work and recitals and wrote about half of the History of Bands in Utah for the degree but did not finish it after returning to Utah and becoming very busy at CEU. In the summers of 1973-74, Janis, my wife, and I were selected to be part of the American Music Abroad Program and spent two summers working with students selected from the Western United States to make a tour of several European countries. Interesting enough, one of the French horn players, Kathy Robison, who grew up in California and is now in the Cache Community Band, was a part of one of those tours. I served for several years on the UMEA board and was president of UMEA from 1981-85. In 1995, I was given the Outstanding Music Educators Award and served as the Retired Members Chair from 2003-04. Even at my age of 77, I am still involved in music. We moved from Price to Logan ten years ago and both my wife and I are involved in several music organizations, including the Cache Community Band, which I currently direct, and the Imperial Glee Club where I sing and my wife is the accompanist. It is interesting every Sunday morning to watch the Tabernacle Choir broadcast and see the director, Mack Wilberg, who was my wife's piano student and my clarinet student doing such a fantastic job with the Choir. Clay Christiansen, who often plays organ on the broadcast, was also one of Janis's students. Janis and I are thrilled to be able to attend the UMEA convention and enjoy seeing you wonderful people. Our oldest son, Michael Siggard, teaches the band program at Wasatch High School. It is a wonderful experience to see and hear many of the happenings in the Utah Music Educators Association.

Jeneile Tams

Jeneile Tams

I was born in Logan, Utah to Neil R. and Verda O. Tams. I have two sisters, Gayle and Nola, and two brothers, Bruce and Clinton. I now live on our family farm north of Paradise, Utah. I attended Paradise Elementary School, South Cache High School and received BFA and MS degrees from Utah State University. I have always loved music. My mother taught us songs and my father enjoyed playing the piano when he wasn’t busy on our dairy farm. I had some piano lessons, but my real start on a career in music came when I persuaded my parents to purchase an old metal clarinet from a neighbor. Our band class at Paradise Elementary School was held only once a week and was taught by Grant Jenkins, the Band Director at South Cache. I was fortunate to have wonderful teachers throughout high school; Gene Furniss, Clark Gardner and Thomas G. Nelson, who arranged for me to study clarinet with Max Dalby. Dr. Dalby invited me to play with the Utah State Band during my senior year in high school. He also hired me as music librarian. This led to my involvement with the USU Summer Music Clinic, which continued from 1958 to 2004. At USU, Dr. Dalby and Dr. Alvin Wardle taught classes in a renovated cafe. The music library was located in the side of that room, and I will always be thankful for the opportunity to listen as they taught while I sorted music. Their influence has been immeasurable. I began my teaching career at Smithfield Jr. High in 1963 while completing my MS degree at USU. Marvin Strong then hired me to teach elementary band at Crestview, Howard Driggs, Roosevelt and Sherman Schools in the Granite District. In 1969, I was hired to team-teach with Darrell Lund at Bonneville High in Weber District. I also worked with Lewis May at T.H. Bell Jr. High for ten years and traveled to all of the other Weber District Jr. High Schools as a woodwind specialist. I was appointed as Band Director at North Ogden Jr. High in the fall of 1978 and taught at Mountain Crest, South Cache and Willow Valley. From November 2001 to March 2002, I worked as an Olympic Volunteer at the Opening and Closing Ceremonies. Since that time, I have enjoyed substituting for music teachers in the Cache, Logan and Weber Districts. I have played with the USU Alumni Band from 1960 to the present and have been a member of the Cache Chamber Orchestra since 2003. UMEA has always been very important in my development and improvement as a teacher. I was a student member of MENC/UMEA while at USU and attended the Fall and Mid-Winter Conferences. When Gordon Jessop began his term as President, he asked me to serve as secretary. In 1977, I was elected treasurer and served 14 years in that capacity. I received the 1985 UMEA Special Service Award and the Outstanding Jr. High/Middle School Educator Award in 2000. The people I have met and worked with in the field of music have been my best friends, my mentors, my idols and my children. Music has been so important to me that I felt I must share it with as many as possible. I hope it has enriched their lives as it has mine.


































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